All vows – dVerse Poetics

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Let us celebrate ourselves

Let us forgive ourselves

Let us rejoice in our imperfections

Let us be perfect despite (because of) our crack’d carapaces

and (despite) because of our fissured souls

Let us be gentle to ourselves

Let us speak softly, kindly to ourselves

Let us do all of those things

and yet strive to be better, next year.

Let us do all of those things

for ourselves, for others

Let us be who we are.

Let us be.


Tonight on dVerse Poetics, the wonderful Walt asks us to celebrate. We can mark a special national or international day, a day of faith (or no faith), or just celebrate our lives.

I have chosen to mark Kol Nidre, in my own very liberal Jewish way. Yom Kippur is marked by the Kol Nidre service at the (evening) start of this holiest of holy days. Translated, the Aramaic of Kol Nidre (meaning ‘All vows’)  annuls any personal or religious oaths or prohibitions made by you to God for the next year, so as to  avoid the sin of breaking vows made to God which cannot be, or are not upheld.

I have taken this and turned it into a celebration of our glorious imperfections, of the brokenness of being human. Make of it what you will – I enjoyed writing it very much.

I’m looking forward to reading what others have chosen to celebrate over on dVerse – why not take a look?

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Cabaret – dVerse Poetics

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Wikipedia

 

Greasepaint and glitter and show me your thighs

encased in the finest of silks.

Tip me the wink, girl,

sashay on over,

wrap yourself around that lucky ole chair

step on the seat back,

tip it on over

run your fingers through that brassy blond wig.

Bite your cherry red lip,

pout in my direction,

flutter your eyelashes

to hide who you truly are.

(But I can see through you

I can unravel the secret inside).

You hope I don’t know you.

you think you are hidden,

but I have the list

and your name is right here.

‘Jude’ runs right through you

and it’s only a matter of time

until that old gold star

emblazons itself on your skin,

until the flames devour you

and you join the planets spangling above.

‘Til then my sweet hussy

dance for your life.


 

This week on dVerse Poetics, Lillian invites us to write, inspired by the words razzle, dazzle and sparkle. Hmm… this immediately took me to one of my favourite films of all time – Cabaret. I love it for the music, the clever lyrics and (this won’t be a surprise to those who know me) the period of history and where it is set, in Berlin.

The dark brooding presence of the Nazis is so well-entwined with the hedonistic feel of pre-war Berlin’s cabaret scene, it haunts me. So my idea of razzle, dazzle and sparkle is inextricably interwoven with that, I’m afraid. Hey ho – I never claimed to be anything but a dark writer, except on occasion!

Please do head on over to dVerse and enjoy the work of other poets!

The order of things – dVerse Poetics

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The speckled ones

brown, or blue, or white.

The ones that sit snugly in the middle,

neither dark, nor pallid..

The ones that have been scooped clean

– who knows, through birth or via another

method of emptying –

vacancy converted to bellies replete

and bodies nurtured with sustenance.

The shells, so delicate in the face of human force,

protect their precious cargo

until they burst forth, scraggled and slimy,

waiting to blossom into sun-yellow balls

reminiscent of the yolks we consume with such gusto.

The brown ones, the blue ones, the white ones,

the somewhere in between ones,

spotted or naked.

Which is best?

Nature knows.

Mother Nature loves them all, equally.

As do I.


 

Tonight over on dVerse Poetics, our lovely host Grace asks us to be inspired by the art of a wonderful artist, Emily Blincoe. Emily has kindly given her permission for each of us to include her art in our blogs, and you can see the piece that inspired me above.

I love eggs, both to eat (in many, many ways), and also as a beautiful piece of Nature’s design in their own right. Plus of course, they are fascinatingly delicate and strangely strong – a perfect oxymoron!

Please do head on over to dVerse to read how others have responded to Emily’s work (not just eggs!).