Back to Basics – dVerse Form for All

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Rabbie Burns fell upon his sword they say

But I knew he was pitchforking hay

Literally, I took their words

Because he had only wanted herbs.

 

Herbs to make his food more savoury

For he was sick of bread and gravy

But bread it is the staff of life

Saving the stomach from hungry strife

 

He had eschewed his wife’s basic meal

Then worked on the farm, his void purse to heal

He dropped down dead, empty and vague

All for his obsession with parsley and sage.


 

Oh, Form for All, how I enjoy you! Here’s my thought process.

“Dammit, it’s 8pm (here in the UK), I’ve not long got home from work, I’m tired, I just want to put my feet up… Noo! dVerse! Why do I have to work out how t write a new poetry form? Why isn’t it Open Link Night?… Hmm, I could have some fun with this… Oh! I have an idea…!”

Tonight over on dVerse, Gayle has invited us to write a Clerihew. As Gayle explains ‘A Clerihew is a comic verse on biographical topics consisting of two couplets and a specific rhyming scheme of aabb that was invented by Edmund Clerihew Bentley (1875-1956) at the age of 16.’

I hope you enjoy my attempt – I have no idea where the story came from (not unusual, to be honest)!

Why not have a go yourself? It’s fun!

** Gayle kindly pointed out I forgot to include the name of a famous person in the first line of my poem… So I have used Rabbie Burns, the Scottish poet who was the son of a farmer. Thank you, Gayle!

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Denied – A Dash of Sunny

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The winds they howl and moan tonight
They say they’ll bring the folks a fright
Tear down trees and windows break
The gales will keep us all awake

‘Tis Halloween, the ghosts and ghouls
Should roam the earth and steal our souls
But the weather has them beat
And whipped them all from off their feet

They’re wrapped around the chimney stacks
Caught in trees, trapped in shacks
The wind has sucked away their cries
And turned them dumb, to their surprise

They clench their fists and gnash their teeth
Their tortured souls find no release
The one night of the year for fun
Has left our ghastly ghostlies glum

Frustrated in their scary games
They feel let down, a sense of shame
That dawn is almost on their heels
And not a scream has been revealed

From the throats of human prey
The winds have stolen fear away
The storm dies down, the daylight looms
The scary fiends are bathed in gloom

‘Twas Halloween, a terrible night
For ghosts that die to cause a fright
Mother Nature upped her game
The ghouls were silenced – what a shame!


 

It’s time for the weekly challenge from A Dash of Sunny, and this week, she asks us to write on ghosts. I’m very happy about this, since I had been looking back through my blog archives and found a poem I first wrote for dVerse in October 2013, when the prompt was (of course) Hallowe’en related. I remember enjoying writing this at the time – let’s face it, I don’t often reveal my comedic slant (at least not in writing!).

I hope you enjoy it, this sideways look on ghosts. Please do head over to A Dash of Sunny to delve into the other side, courtesy of the creative folks that take part!

Fishy Tale – Magpie Tales

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Dark Harbor, 1943, N. C. Wyeth

“We have too much food here, Jacob. What are we supposed to do with it all? It wasn’t our plan to empty the sea of all its fish.”

“Nonsense, Simeon, nonsense! There is no such thing as too much fish! How ungrateful you are! Me and my men have risked life and limb on the mountainous waves to bring this fine haul home to harbour. Not a life lost, not a bruise nor a scrape did we sustain. Does it not cross your mind to utter one word of thanks?”

“But where is your common sense? All of our salt has been used for the preserving of meat and our barrels are taken with wine. We cannot consume the fish fast enough. It will be left to waste and rot by the quay.”

“You see problems where there are none, Simeon. I propose a feast – let us build a bonfire, barbecue the meat over the flames and wash it all down with copious gallons of wine. We will have empty barrels, spare salt and extremely happy villagers. A solution, do you not agree?”

“I suppose I do, Jacob. You are an ingenious man, so it seems…”

——

Here’s my latest entry to Magpie Tales – Jacob is a quick-thinking chap, no?

I hope you enjoy this week’s entry- and please do visit Magpie Tales for amazing poetry and prose!

 

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