In the hours – dVerse Open Link

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Those nights when I can’t sleep

and curse – in my belief – that I

am the only one staring into the abyss

at 3am.

Those days when I can’t stop

the thoughts in my head from eating me alive

and casting a shadow over

a glorious sunshine day

at 2pm.

Those mornings when I can’t bear

to drag myself out of bed

and drag my carcass through

one more day

at 6am.

Those days

I have to stop myself

from giving up

from giving in

from turning in

from tuning out.

 

I have so much.

Food on the table.

Money in the bank.

A heart that beats

so strong, so long, so fiercely.

 

I have so much

at 3am

at 2pm

at 6am.

I have so much.


 

Tonight is Open Link Night here on dVerse, hosted by our stalwart Swedish host, Bjorn. He has shared the story of Sean Michael with us today, who only gets to post on OLN as he is currently in prison, has no access to the internet and can only connect with us through the wonderful assistance of his grandmother, who posts on his behalf, is his lifeline to the outside world. Here is his blog Mad Poet Enchanted – so very, very worth a look. Sean has somehow managed to fund the publishing of a book of his poetry, despite all the obstacle sin his way – he is such an inspiration.

So… my poem is somewhat of a response to his story. We’re having a bit of a heatwave here in the UK and it’s making commuting somewhat uncomfortable – it’s nothing really, and reading Sean’s story has reminded me of all that I have to be grateful for. I truly am, but sometimes, I forget…

Please do head on over to dVerse and dive in – and please do read about Sean.

By the way, I am so behind in reading others’ work – I will catch up over the weekend, that’s a promise!

 

Fun guy – TJ’s Household Haiku Challenge

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mushroom box hiding

in the dark airing cupboard

white orbs float in space

 

caps like velvet hats

silky texture makes me smile

squeak as I bite you


 

This week, the gorgeous TJ has invited us to waxy lyrical, Haiku style, on mushrooms. I really, really, really like mushrooms. I like them so much, I eat them raw – which many of my friends and acquaintances think is a little odd! Is it really?

Anyway, here’s my weekly offering. There always seemed to be a mushroom box on the go in our airing cupboard when I was growing up and I loved peeking into the gloom to spot the first white globes peeking through the inky black compost.

I hope you take the time to hop on over to TJ’s blog and read all the tasty poetry – and take part if you feel the urge!

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Sukha Aloo – dVerse Poetics

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My growing-up world is a map of aromas –

as my little snub nose lifts like a sniffer dog’s

as my beady eyes interrogate the shelves

as my chubby fingers reach out to touch –

cumin, paprika, star anise, cinnamon, cardamom, coriander garam masala…

the list is never ending and exotic to my ears

my heart explodes and my mouth waters in anticipation

at the glories that will dance on my tongue – later

the kitchen will swell with steam and spatter

the pots will bubble, burping explosions of delight into the air

meat will sizzle, onions will sweat, my skin will prickle

and later, much later, so very, very much later

chapati and naan will wipe our plates clean

raita will soothe our burning tongues

and i will save my helping of sukha aloo to the very last

because they are my favourite thing of all


 

Tonight, Grace, our lovely host over at the dVerse pub, invites us to write about scents, aromas, and evoke emotions. For me, the choice was obvious – food!

Oh what a joyous write this was for me, a real step back in time to my childhood of 1970s Birmingham! We lived not too far from a wondrous street called Ladypool Road in Sparkbrook (in the midst of the Balti Triangle), which was an absolute delight to anyone who wanted – no, needed – to buy herbs, spices and other necessary foodstuffs to create real authentic cuisine from around the world (there were and still are brilliant restaurants there too). From my memory, we went there to buy food to make curries – my step-dad would take over the kitchen and create absolutely wonderful food (I hope you can tell I loved it!).

My mum and step-dad took me to an Indian restaurant when I was little (back in the days of the flock wallpaper) – the Indian waiters were all amazed to see a little white girl eat proper curry! I felt very proud of my apparent prowess! I loved being part of the multi-cultural city where I grew up. It was a fantastic education in its own right.

Please do join in dVerse Poetics before the two week summer break – or if you’re feeling shy, at least come and enjoy the wonderful selection of poetry I know you will find there!